Round-up of Schools' news Spring 2012

Posted by Audrey Curnock on Wednesday, April 25, 2012
Britain Falls behind Europe
Britain has fewer people educated to A'level standard than in other European countries such as Estonia, Latvia & Slovakia, it has been revealed in published data.  Source:  Telegraph 8/2/2012.

Key GCSE subjects will be made harder
Mathematics & English Literature are to be toughened up amid fears that pupils are developing superficial-subject knowledge, Ofqual announces.  We fully support this at Education Unlimited.  Source:   Telegraph, 24/2/2012.
 
Schools act as Surrogate Parents
Sir Michael Wilshaw, new Head of Ofsted, states that teachers increasingly are required to instil traditional values in pupils.  Source:   Telegraph, 24/2/2012. 

[Schools have always done this. Teachers work in partnership with parents. ]

A' Level Maths : teenagers perceive it as too difficult
The Department of Education's research shows that only 20% of those teenagers with a GCSE Maths grade in the A* to C range go on to take A'level Maths. Their study also shows that 59% of teenagers in England  attain an A* to C GCSE in Mathematics.   Source :  Telegraph 24/2/2012.  [ We have a long way to go to produce another Professor Sir Andrew Wiles.] 

Trouble at The WJEC Examination Board
The CEO of Ofqual says it's "unfair" for examination boards to expect schools to pay for expensive courses to be given additional guidance   (following WJEC'd recent  exposure). Source : Telegraph 22/3/2012
At Education Unlimited we'd be inclined to see this as a conflict of interest with Examinations boards. Another conflict of interest is that examination boards now publish text books designed for their syllabuses. That doesn't seem quite right to us.

The Triumph of Parent Power : New  Grammar School in Kent
Sevenoaks will have it's own grammar (almost anyway : two satellites run by existing grammars in nearby towns) following an e-petition set up by local parents.  With 164 grammar schools in place, 1998 legislation prohibits the creation of any new state-funded grammars.  Source : Telegraph 30/3/2012
 
Well done ladies, and Mr Gove, do we have to limit the type of schools we have?


  



Round-up of Schools' news Spring 2012

Posted by Audrey Curnock on Wednesday, April 25, 2012
Britain Falls behind Europe
Britain has fewer people educated to A'level standard than in other European countries such as Estonia, Latvia & Slovakia, it has been revealed in published data.  Source:  Telegraph 8/2/2012.

Key GCSE subjects will be made harder
Mathematics & English Literature are to be toughened up amid fears that pupils are developing superficial-subject knowledge, Ofqual announces.  We fully support this at Education Unlimited.  Source:   Telegraph, 24/2/2012.
 
Schools act as Surrogate Parents
Sir Michael Wilshaw, new Head of Ofsted, states that teachers increasingly are required to instil traditional values in pupils.  Source:   Telegraph, 24/2/2012. 

[Schools have always done this. Teachers work in partnership with parents. ]

A' Level Maths : teenagers perceive it as too difficult
The Department of Education's research shows that only 20% of those teenagers with a GCSE Maths grade in the A* to C range go on to take A'level Maths. Their study also shows that 59% of teenagers in England  attain an A* to C GCSE in Mathematics.   Source :  Telegraph 24/2/2012.  [ We have a long way to go to produce another Professor Sir Andrew Wiles.] 

Trouble at The WJEC Examination Board
The CEO of Ofqual says it's "unfair" for examination boards to expect schools to pay for expensive courses to be given additional guidance   (following WJEC'd recent  exposure). Source : Telegraph 22/3/2012
At Education Unlimited we'd be inclined to see this as a conflict of interest with Examinations boards. Another conflict of interest is that examination boards now publish text books designed for their syllabuses. That doesn't seem quite right to us.

The Triumph of Parent Power : New  Grammar School in Kent
Sevenoaks will have it's own grammar (almost anyway : two satellites run by existing grammars in nearby towns) following an e-petition set up by local parents.  With 164 grammar schools in place, 1998 legislation prohibits the creation of any new state-funded grammars.  Source : Telegraph 30/3/2012
 
Well done ladies, and Mr Gove, do we have to limit the type of schools we have?